Webcams

D-Link DSB-C100 PC Camera (USB)

Posted On June 15, 2015 at 10:47 am by / No Comments

D-Link DSB-C100 PC Camera (USB)

Product Features

  • 352 x 288 video resolution
  • Microphone required for sending audio
  • USB 1.1 interface
  • Includes video conferencing software
  • Compatible with Windows 98, 2000, Me, and XP; Mac OS 8.6 to 9.1

Product Description

List Price: $ 69.99

Savings: 58.09

Your Price: [wpramaprice asin=”B00004XRCY”]

Customer Reviews


29 of 31 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars
A very good camera, October 6, 2000
By 
Torben Hansen (Vancouver, BC Cananda) – See all my reviews

This review is from: D-Link DSB-C100 PC Camera (USB) (Personal Computers)
The first thing I like about this video camera is thit it looks really cool. First it has a really neat clear baby blue style, with a matching cable. Next I like how small it is, I can place it anywhere. Its got a pritty sharp capture, plus it has a mic biult in! Overall I like how the software works, you just click and its on, and with USB i can bring it to a friends house and lit him use it.

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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars
Disappointed? Well… maybe. Satisified? ABSOLUTELY NOT!, December 18, 2000
By 
“f22b1” (Vancouver, BC, CANADA) – See all my reviews

This review is from: D-Link DSB-C100 PC Camera (USB) (Personal Computers)
Just got this cam.. This is not the newer clear case with swing head cam (same as hawking model) that other sells. (NO WONDER THE PICTURE IS NOT SHOWN!!) I was expecting the clear case model from US dlink web page. This is the old hard plastic – blue strip model in the Canadian dlink web page. The driver set that comes with the cam doesn’t work in Windows2000 or WindowsMe. It works fine in Windows98. You need to get the new drivers… in order to make it work. Or go to dlink ftp and look for the clear case driver. This cam also doesn’t like Aver OR ATI PCI TV tuner card either. When it finally works, the picture quality is definitly better than the older Logitech Quickcam Express USB. And slightly faster than Creative WebCamIII at CIF. Consider it a fair value for a fair price.

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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars
Very Disappointed! Old Product, no support!, December 3, 2001
By 
S. Sheen “shengs75” (Omaha, NE United States) – See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)
  

Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
This review is from: D-Link DSB-C100 PC Camera (USB) (Personal Computers)
I got this webcam because I wanted an inexpensive webcam. The driver that came with the webcam does not work. I tried downloading the driver from D-Link’s site. The driver still doesn’t work. I tried calling D-Link, and the 800 number is not in service for that product. If I don’t get this thing working by tomorrow I’m returning it(…) It’s frustrating to have a product not work out of the box. I’m installing this on Windows98 Second Edition. It’s via USB, so no power cord necessary.

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D-Link Wireless Internet Camera, Home Security, 802.11b, 11Mbps

Product Features

  • Archive Streaming Video to Your Hard Drive
  • Bundled Software for Multi-Camera Monitoring and Management
  • Integrated Web Server
  • Web-based Remote Access Using Any Java Enabled Web Browser
  • 802.11b Wireless or 10/100Mbps Fast Ethernet Connection

Product Description

The D-Link DCS-900W Internet Camera is compact, discreet, wireless and Web-enabled. It enables you to mount it anywhere within range of your wireless network and to monitor the premises remotely. The wireless standard used is 802.11b, which is 11 Mbit/s, which is adequate for securitry monitoring purposes.

List Price: $ 129.99

Savings: 5.99

Your Price: [wpramaprice asin="B0001BXV9U"]

Customer Reviews


102 of 107 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars
It's a good buy for the price., April 14, 2004
By 
Richard "First GPS" (Hacienda Heights, CA United States) - See all my reviews

Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: D-Link Wireless Internet Camera, Home Security, 802.11b, 11Mbps (Personal Computers)
I just bought this product and it's all what I expected. I just followed the quick installation guide, plugged in ethernet cable and the power, set the ip as recommended 192.168.0.20 on the camera and my wireless Netgear router and it works. I can view the camera immediately. But when I unplug the ethernet and into wireless mode, it didn't work. I ended up calling tech support and got a live support person in less than 5 minutes, he suggested I reboot(power down and up) my camera and router. The wireless mode now working.
I tried to set the camera up behind the router according to the instruction on the manual from the CD provided, it didn't work. After playing around for 3 hours, I finally figured out that the default port 80 and 8481 don't work, you have to open up the second port 81 and 8482. I IPView software provided in the CD does not have motion sensor, you can download the latest version of IPView with motion sensor for the DLINK website, and it works very well. It can detect a slightest movement.
PROS: price, good picture(can adjust brightness), motion sensor software(download latest IPView).
CONS: no audio, can not pan view(must manually pan camera), no email picture option.

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80 of 83 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars
Much better than the alternatives, February 3, 2006
By 
N. J. Simicich "Gadget Geek" (Labelle, FL United States) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)
  
(REAL NAME)
  

This review is from: D-Link Wireless Internet Camera, Home Security, 802.11b, 11Mbps (Personal Computers)

These are a new generation of "webcams". These cameras have a built in web server. They connect to your home net via ethernet. Management programs can display the images from the cameras on your computer screen.

I recently examined a Hawking camera. Superficially, it seemed to have security, but there were only two official ways to get an image from the camera. One was by using a facility where the camera e-mailed you an image. This image was tagged as spam by my provider because it used the big5 character set, even though it contained no text. But the other way was to use a java applet which was automatically downloaded from the camera, the same way any applet would be loaded.

This was the only image data displayed on the camera's web interface.

I wanted to get a still image, so I traced the applet's data stream. The applet simply connected to a port on the camera and then presented four characters and a newline. The camera responded with a four byte header and a jpeg. I was able to use echo, sleep and netcat to pull jpegs out of the camera - but I did not have to present the password to pull jpegs out of the camera.

The instructions that come with the camera tell you to open this port to the Internet via port forwarding from your firewall. You also open the camera's web port.

If you do this, then a hacker can see that you have this camera and then they can look for other open ports, and if they find the camera port, they can easily pull jpegs out of it with no password.

This is OK, though, since the camera is so incredibly bad that all that anyone will see is sort of a flesh shaped amorphous mass. I took this camera back to the store.

There are two other products on the market. One is the D-Link DCS-900W, and the other is the Linksys Wireless G. Both are comparable to the Hawking and way better.

The Linksys presents both sound and video as an MPEG4 stream. I know of no way to get still images from this camera (other than by having the camera e-mail you one). There is an active X control that allows you to view the video on a windows system, or, with the right codecs, you can use Media Player or Mplayer to view the stream. However, only a Windows user using Internet Explorer can access the camera through the web interfacr and see full motion video. Everyone else can go through multiple layers of frames to determe what the url is for the mpeg4 stream - then, that URL can be fed to a regular media player that can play (or record) an mpeg4 stream.

The Linksys can be connected to a 10 or 100 wired ethernet, or to an 802.11b or 802.11g wireless net. It supports WEP. By default it is configured to run at a fixed address - but it can run on WEP. A unique feature is that it has a small LCD panel and the LCD panel displays the IP address that it uses. It can look for motion within the camera and send out alerts by e-mail if motion is detected (that is, no external program is required to deal with automated motion detection from this camera). All data is presented on the web interface, and basic authentication (userid and password) is demanded if the camera is set up to require it before the video stream, or any data other than the base screen is presented. There are two levels of users - those who can display the video stream and one user who can administer the box.

I have not installed the Linksys management software - it seems to be unneeded. If I could find an open source solution that would allow me to convert mpeg4 to a still jpeg, then this would be the winning solution. But the conversion stacks I have found garble the images horribly. I believe that there is conversion available in the support software.

The D-Link has a URL where a jpeg can be accessed. All interaction is via web - and all interaction requires basic security. There are two levels of users - One user who can configure the camera and those who can just display pics.

The D-Link has a Java applet and an active-X control - take your pick - that allows you to view motion pictures - and it also has full motion video - so you can view full motion video from any browser that supports Java applets, or, if you are an IE user who has not installed Java, you can use the Active-X control to look at the video. Thus, the full motion video should work for almost everyone - I know it works in Linux and Windows. The D-Link has the best low light capability. It also has the clearest picture, by far. It does not have 802.11g and it does not have sound. It does support WEP. Internally, (to the applet) the motion data is presented as a series of jpegs, using a standard http stream format. All video or jpeg data is presented only after successful basic authentication.

The management software for the D-Link camera works reasonably well, but there is no reason to use it other than, perhaps, for upgrading the...

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26 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars
best bang/buck=winner, November 21, 2004
By 

Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: D-Link Wireless Internet Camera, Home Security, 802.11b, 11Mbps (Personal Computers)
for the price, this is a great tool. if u need night time viewing, add a motion detector.

i found a 4x4x6 waterproof plastic box at Home Depot, begged them for a 3x3 glass scrap, and mounted this outside w/motion detector light (see above). we'll see how it handles Florida sun next summer.

bingo! i now have 5 of these running very nicely.

please note that i use free linux software instead of PC monitoring app (IP-View) that comes with it, but friends seem to have good luck w/that app. the linux app ('motion') allows me to mix USB, video, and network cams in one survelliance app.

newest firmware for cam (2.28) hasn't crashed since i booted it over a week ago fyi.

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